Rick Perry Needs To Take Morality Lessons From Deval Patrick

crooksandliars:

Rick Perry Needs To Take Morality Lessons From Deval Patrick

Could there be two more disparate responses to the border crisis than those from Governors Rick Perry and Deval Patrick? One governor grandstands for the cameras while pondering a run at the White House; the other explains his very personal and moral decision to offer shelter to children.

Both call themselves Christians but only one demonstrates what a Christian response looks like. Hint: it’s not Rick Perry.

Watch him explain to citizens and the press why this isn’t political. It’s moral.

Here’s the verse he quoted, from Leviticus 19:33-34, NIV: When a foreigner resides among you in your land, do not mistreat them. 34 The foreigner residing among you must be treated as your native-born. Love them as yourself, for you were foreigners in Egypt.

Someone should ask Rick Perry why he doesn’t follow the Bible he thumps with such regularity.


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beingliberal:

We are at a pivotal moment in American history. … When large corporations and a few wealthy families can spend unlimited sums of money to buy and sell politicians, it is now clear to most Americans that the foundation of American democracy is under severe attack.”From “Democracy or Oligarchy?” by +Bernie Sanders , in the July/August 2014 special issue of +The Progressive Magazine .Thanks to +Worley Dervish  

beingliberal:

We are at a pivotal moment in American history. … When large corporations and a few wealthy families can spend unlimited sums of money to buy and sell politicians, it is now clear to most Americans that the foundation of American democracy is under severe attack.”

From “Democracy or Oligarchy?” by +Bernie Sanders , in the July/August 2014 special issue of +The Progressive Magazine .

Thanks to +Worley Dervish  

nprglobalhealth:

Straightening Sisay’s Spine: A Twist Of Fate Saves A Boy’s Life
One dewy morning back in May 2013, a dozen children gathered in an elementary school courtyard to play soccer in Addis Ababa. Seven-year-old Sisay Gudeta stood alone on the balcony above them.
Sisay poked his head through the arms of a rusty, blue guard rail, staring down at his classmates as they kickedan empty plastic bottle across the pavement. The kids rarely ask him to play, Sisay says. They are afraid to touch him, afraid of the bump on his back that stretches out his neatly pressed school sweater.
"He is such a beautiful child," Sisay’s grandmother says. "I ask God what I did to do this to him."
For reasons unknown, thousands of children in Ethiopia suffer from congenital spine conditions so severe that humps grow from their backs. Their spines resemble flattened pancakes and roller-coaster tracks, says Dr. Rick Hodes, an American who runs the onlyspine clinic in Addis Ababa, a city of 3 million people.
Such extreme scoliosis cases are found in many poor countries. But Hodes thinks that lack of screening and access to basic medical care leaves Ethiopia with some of the worst spines in the world.
If not effectively treated, scoliosis can lead to permanent deformity, disc injuries and neurological damage. Here in the U.S., the National Institutes of Health recommends doctors use a brace to help straighten a child’s back when the spine curves more than 25 to 30 degrees. When the curve reaches more than 45 degrees, surgery is often needed.
Yet thousands of Ethiopian children receive no medical treatment for their scoliosis. In villages, a traditional healer may try to flatten the child’s back by pressing hot rocks to the skin. Others with twisted spines and humpbacks are ostracized or abandoned and left to die.
Continue reading and view a slideshow at NPR.
Photo: Sisay Gudeta, then age 7, sits on his bed at his home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 2013. At the time, his spine curved about 120 degrees. Without surgery, Sisay’s scoliosis would have killed before age 18, doctors said. (Andrew Dickinson for NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

Straightening Sisay’s Spine: A Twist Of Fate Saves A Boy’s Life

One dewy morning back in May 2013, a dozen children gathered in an elementary school courtyard to play soccer in Addis Ababa. Seven-year-old Sisay Gudeta stood alone on the balcony above them.

Sisay poked his head through the arms of a rusty, blue guard rail, staring down at his classmates as they kickedan empty plastic bottle across the pavement. The kids rarely ask him to play, Sisay says. They are afraid to touch him, afraid of the bump on his back that stretches out his neatly pressed school sweater.

"He is such a beautiful child," Sisay’s grandmother says. "I ask God what I did to do this to him."

For reasons unknown, thousands of children in Ethiopia suffer from congenital spine conditions so severe that humps grow from their backs. Their spines resemble flattened pancakes and roller-coaster tracks, says Dr. Rick Hodes, an American who runs the onlyspine clinic in Addis Ababa, a city of 3 million people.

Such extreme scoliosis cases are found in many poor countries. But Hodes thinks that lack of screening and access to basic medical care leaves Ethiopia with some of the worst spines in the world.

If not effectively treated, scoliosis can lead to permanent deformity, disc injuries and neurological damage. Here in the U.S., the National Institutes of Health recommends doctors use a brace to help straighten a child’s back when the spine curves more than 25 to 30 degrees. When the curve reaches more than 45 degrees, surgery is often needed.

Yet thousands of Ethiopian children receive no medical treatment for their scoliosis. In villages, a traditional healer may try to flatten the child’s back by pressing hot rocks to the skin. Others with twisted spines and humpbacks are ostracized or abandoned and left to die.

Continue reading and view a slideshow at NPR.

Photo: Sisay Gudeta, then age 7, sits on his bed at his home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, May 2013. At the time, his spine curved about 120 degrees. Without surgery, Sisay’s scoliosis would have killed before age 18, doctors said. (Andrew Dickinson for NPR)

shelterpetproject:

Norah was found abandoned in a field with her puppy, who was still nursing. She finally came to the Sonoma Humane Society in Santa Rosa, California, where her baby was fortunately adopted into a wonderful home!
Now she’s been waiting a whole year, and she still hasn’t been adopted and is losing hope. Please make sure this lonely mama dog has a chance!
Norah is friendly, loves people and has very polite leash manors. She is 3 years old and healthy. Local and out of area adoptions are available; contact Jordan@cwob.org for more information regarding this sweet girl!
Zoom Info
shelterpetproject:

Norah was found abandoned in a field with her puppy, who was still nursing. She finally came to the Sonoma Humane Society in Santa Rosa, California, where her baby was fortunately adopted into a wonderful home!
Now she’s been waiting a whole year, and she still hasn’t been adopted and is losing hope. Please make sure this lonely mama dog has a chance!
Norah is friendly, loves people and has very polite leash manors. She is 3 years old and healthy. Local and out of area adoptions are available; contact Jordan@cwob.org for more information regarding this sweet girl!
Zoom Info

shelterpetproject:

Norah was found abandoned in a field with her puppy, who was still nursing. She finally came to the Sonoma Humane Society in Santa Rosa, California, where her baby was fortunately adopted into a wonderful home!

Now she’s been waiting a whole year, and she still hasn’t been adopted and is losing hope. Please make sure this lonely mama dog has a chance!

Norah is friendly, loves people and has very polite leash manors. She is 3 years old and healthy. Local and out of area adoptions are available; contact Jordan@cwob.org for more information regarding this sweet girl!